7 Coffees More Expensive Than Starbucks

For many people, coffee in the morning is a necessity, but that doesn’t mean it can’t also be a luxury. If you prefer your jolt of caffeine to come with a side of extravagance, try one of these 7 rare and expensive coffees from around the world.

Monkey Spit Coffee

Liao Jingdong had enjoyed a 30 year career as a humble Taiwanese coffee farmer when one day he had a brilliant idea: to roast beans that had been spat out by the Formosan rock monkeys. He struck gold that day, finding that the beans took on a sweeter vanilla-like flavour once spat out by the monkeys. Jingdong now produces around 600 lbs a year and it’s considered a rarity, selling for about $60 per pound.

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Monkey Spit Coffee

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St. Helena Coffee

When French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte was exiled to the tropical isle of St. Helena located off the coast of Brazil, he said “the only good thing” about his six-year stay there was the delectable coffee. Derived from the Green-Tipped Bourbon Arabica coffee plant that was brought there from Yemen in the 18th Century, St. Helena Coffee is described as having a fruity and floral flavour and is one of the rarest and most expensive coffees in the world, selling for up to $79 per pound.

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St. Helena Coffee

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Esmeralda Special

This fragrant and delectable coffee bean is famous for its rare tangerine taste – and large price tag. Sometimes selling for up to $117 per pound, these beans are harvested from the family-owned Hacienda La Esmeralda estate in Panama and are said to be different due to the conditions in which they’re grown. The altitude of Panama means the days are warm and nights are cool, thus slowing down the ripening process and make for a sweeter, more acidic bean.

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Kopi Luwak

Do you think that paying $227 for a pound of coffee is a load of crap? You’d be right if you were talking about Kopi Luwak, an Indonesian coffee bean that is harvested from the poop of the Asian palm civet. Civets, which are feline-like forest mammals, eat the coffee cherries but cannot digest them. They excrete the beans which are then collected, washed, sun-dried and roasted. Aside from the high price tag, this cup of joe comes with an additional cost: what was once a folk practice has since turned into a cash crop that’s reportedly harvested using animal cruelty and questionable business practices.

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Kopi Luwak

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Black Ivory Coffee

Riding on the coattails of the Kopi Luwak trend comes another “crapuccino” craze: Black Ivory Coffee beans. Harvested from the dung of Thai elephants, Black Ivory is said to be smoother due to the elephant’s stomach acids breaking down the proteins of the bean which cuts back on the bitterness. It can take up to 70 hours for the beans to ferment inside the elephant so the process is slow and only 440 pounds of Black Ivory coffee can be harvested each season. To taste this delicacy yourself, it will set you back $500 per pound. If you can (or even want) to get your hands on it, that is.

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