16 Lies Trump Told at the Second Presidential Debate

The town-hall style Second Presidential Debate that was held on Sunday, October 9th went pretty much as most Americans expected. Hillary Clinton was professional, proper and stuck mostly to her talking points, while Donald Trump roamed the stage aggressively, giving at most a one-sentence answer to the question before going off on his own tangent. Moderators Martha Raddatz and Anderson Cooper attempted to re-route the discussion whenever it went off topic, but were generally not very successful.

Later, fact checkers caught both candidates in untruths, but Donald Trump made by far more untrue statements. Here are a few lies that fact-checkers caught during the debate.

Trump on NAFTA: “We lost our jobs.”

This isn’t true. Employment has been increasing steadily over the last seven years — ten million more Americans are working than before Barack Obama became President. Perhaps Trump is referring to the loss of factory jobs caused by our increased trade with China, but this trend ended roughly 10 years ago.

Evan El-Amin / Shutterstock.com

Evan El-Amin / Shutterstock.com

The US signed a “peace treaty” with Syria to bring an end to their civil war.

Trump is probably referring to a document that Secretary of State John Kerry drew up with Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov, which dictated the terms of a temporary ceasefire in Syria. This document was not signed by either party, and was definitely not a peace treaty (which would require a 2/3rds majority vote in the Senate). The document led nowhere, and Secretary Kerry is currently calling for a war crimes investigation against the Russian government for their part in the Syrian conflict.

Drop of Light / Shutterstock.com

Drop of Light / Shutterstock.com

We have hundreds of thousands of people pouring into the USA from places like Syria, and we have no idea who they are.

This statement is not only untrue, but it is representative of the rampant Islamophobia that Trump is spreading through his campaign daily. This year, a mere 13,000 Syrian refugees were admitted to the United States, and the Obama Administration is seeking to increase the overall number of refugees to 110,000 for next year. That figure would include a substantial number of Syrian asylum seekers. Refugees go through a two-year vetting process, which is by far the most difficult way to obtain entry into the United States.

Jazzmany / Shutterstock.com

Jazzmany / Shutterstock.com

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