13 Weird Facts About Daylight Saving Time

Not every industry likes Daylight Saving Time

Now that we’re in a culture where organizations spent millions of dollars every year lobbying the government, the war between those who want Daylight Saving Time and those who don’t has gotten much louder. Retailers and fast food chains are active advocates for keeping DST, but the loudest advocates of all are golf courses! They claim that the extra hour of daylight allows for more time on the links, which in turn brings in as much as $400 million in extra revenue per year.

Another pro-Daylight Saving Time group are the candy manufacturers of America, who benefitted from DST being adopted after Halloween so children could have an extra hour of daylight for Trick or Treating. This also has been proven to cut down on Halloween traffic accidents that happen due to children being outside on the roads in the dark.

Naturegraphica Stock / Shutterstock.com

Naturegraphica Stock / Shutterstock.com

In Antarctica, they have 24 hours of darkness in winter, and 24 hours of sunlight in the summer, and they still adopted Daylight Saving Time.

Antarctica is probably the one place in the world where Daylight Saving Time is completely unnecessary — they have 24 hours a day of darkness in the winter, and 24 hours a day of sunlight in the summer. It really messes with your sleep cycle if you’re not used to it! Even though it’s completely unnecessary, the people in the research station in Antarctica have adopted DST in order to keep their clocks synced with their suppliers in places like the USA and Chile.

antantarctic / Shutterstock.com

antantarctic / Shutterstock.com

Trains keep to such a strict schedule that they all stop when time falls back

In the Fall, when the clocks fall one hour back, all of the Amtrak train across the States that are running overnight actually stop for one hour, as to not be an hour early for their upcoming stops. This comes as a surprise to travellers, who are often disgruntled to find their overnight train takes an hour longer than expected. When the clocks move forward in the Spring, the train operators try their hardest to make up the lost time over the course of the day.

EQRoy / Shutterstock.com

EQRoy / Shutterstock.com

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