13 Weird Facts About Daylight Saving Time

Not every country has Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time was first proposed in Britain in 1908, but wasn’t actually implemented there until 1916. And of course, because Britain was such a colonial power at the time, they introduced it to all of the places they had colonized. At first, it was thought of as a great way to save energy for the war effort, but not every country adopted it. There are still many countries around the world that don’t have DST, specifically the grey countries on this map.

TimeZonesBoy / Own Work

TimeZonesBoy / Own Work

Daylight Saving Time is implemented at different times around the world

Many people don’t actually know this, but different countries start their Daylight Saving Time on different days throughout the year. It’s generally around the same time — October for Fall, and March for Spring — but on every weekend in that month, a different set of countries will take on DST.

This makes coordinating international events and meetings in these months very confusing, until the month ends and the rolling wave of time changes has passed for the year. And, to make it even more confusing, it doesn’t actually follow any sort of logic as to which countries change first.

nito / Shutterstock.com

nito / Shutterstock.com

Not everyone agrees with Daylight Saving Time

In 2011, right before the Sochi Olympics, the Russian government voted to get rid of Daylight Saving Time. The International Olympic Committee tried to lobby them to change it back in time for the 2014 Sochi Olympics, claiming that it would confuse the athletes and crowds that were arriving for the games. The Russian government refused, saying that it was just too much of an inconvenience to change it back.

Slavko Sereda / Shutterstock.com

Slavko Sereda / Shutterstock.com

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